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Orren "Pete" Young was the first head light keeper at Split Rock Light Station. Young retired at the mandatory age of 70 in 1928, after 18 years as the head light keeper.

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When the first keepers arrived in the summer of 1910, it was a remote and barren place. The few trees that grew on the cliff top were cut down during the construction, so the wind howled constantly.

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The station closed in 1969 when modern navigational equipment made it obsolete.

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The U. S. Lighthouse Service completed construction of the 7.6-acre facility in 1910 and operated it until 1939, when the U.S. Coast Guard took command.

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Before Lake Superior International Highway was built in 1924, supplies for the light house had to arrive by water and tramway.

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The station was one of the most remote on the Great Lakes when it was commissioned by the U.S. Lighthouse Service in 1910.

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By the time Split Rock Light Station was completed in mid summer 1910, workers had spent 13 months on the desolate cliff, with only a break during the worst months of winter.

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The lighthouse was in operation between the years 1910-1961.

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The official range of the light is 22 miles.

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The cliff that the Split Rock Lighthouse sits atop is 130 feet high.