Amanda Schubert (12th grade) - Sauk Rapids-Rice High School (Rice)

Amanda Schubert (12th grade) - Sauk Rapids-Rice High School (Rice)

My name is Amanda Schubert, and I just graduated from Sauk Rapids-Rice High School this past spring. I am looking forward to traveling to Gettysburg during the 150th anniversary celebration, and being able to view the special reenactments. It will be an awesome experience, especially after learning about the Civil War in my history class at school.

"Attending the Gettysburg anniversary commemoration would be an amazing experience! After taking Advanced Placement United States History at my school last year, I obtained a wealth of historical knowledge. It would be really cool to visit Gettysburg after learning so much about the Civil War in class." - Amanda Schubert

Amanda's Essay

Dear President Lincoln, On November 19, 1863, you challenged America to protect freedom and democracy from destruction by conflicting viewpoints. To this day, America remains a country dedicated to preserving the inborn, unalienable rights granted to all citizens through the sacrifices of our founding fathers. This is not to say that these rights have been given to all without a great struggle. The leaders of the feminist movement, the civil rights movement, and crusaders for voting rights have faced much opposition and hatred. In spite of this adversity, they fought to protect the rights of their fellow citizens in memory of all those who fought for the preservation of the Union in the Civil War. The beauty of America lies in the opportunities given to dreamers to fight for their beliefs and voice their opinions, knowing that they have a chance to encourage positive change for our country. This legacy of the great battle for freedom shows that lives were not lost in vain. Thanks to the sacrifices of American leaders, citizens, and soldiers during the civil war, Americans today enjoy a country that remains true to its original founding principles of justice, liberty, and freedom. Mr. Lincoln, I believe you would be proud of the progress America has made in the years since the Civil War and the dedication of our government to providing a country of opportunity for all those to chose to pursue their dreams.

Sincerely, Amanda Schubert

"Attending the Gettysburg anniversary commemoration would be an amazing experience! After taking Advanced Placement United States History at my school last year, I obtained a wealth of historical knowledge. It would be really cool to visit Gettysburg after learning so much about the Civil War in class."

- Amanda Schubert -

Gettysburg Address

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.